Posts from the “Sharing Economy” Category

Tools for Podcasting

I’ve done voice-over work for theatre and elearning since I was a kid, and this coupled with my natural good face for radio means I’ve always fancied podcasting.  Today I had a great session with my second year class “Social Business and the Sharing Economy”, and we were negotiating their assessed portfolio work for the end of next semester.

One of the ideas that didn’t immediately get shelved (although it might) was to produce a podcast serial on the Sharing Economy.  A run of maybe 6 episodes, each lasting 12-20 minutes.  The podcast will be one of a few projects, including a blog and a printed guide to Sharing Leeds. We might expand to video and transmedia, but before then a podcast is the easier to produce we think.

We want to have a fixed number of episodes and a defined format, but it must be of the highest production standards.  Happily, we have a radio studio (two in fact) at the uni, and editing suites, so no excuse other than lack of skills to make this happen.

I’ve been googling some good “learn to podcast” resources, and after teaching various classes how to plan their blog content, am also looking to see if planning a podcast’s content is any different.  I’m parking some of the most useful looking pieces here:

How to Podcast “The definitive step-by-step guide on how to podcast without breaking the bank. This is the home of the free podcast tutorial that will take your podcast from concept to launch fast and for minimal cost.”

Learn How To Podcast 101 is a video tutorial with more than 120 minutes of instruction that will help you lay a solid foundation for setting up a podcast for future success. This podcasting tutorial will give you all the building blocks to help you understand what is needed to launch your podcast properly.

As for research into formats and content, I also intend to check out Radio 4’s Podcast series “In Pod We Trust” – useful to while away the hours of Christmas driving.

If you have an established podcast and would be interested in talking to my students about it, it’d be great to hear from you.  We can invite you into our classroom in person or via SKYPE.

Please put any recommended tips or resources in the comments.

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Do the right thing! (talk by Simon Wilson)

How to add your WordPress blog to the Creative Commons

The sharp-eyed amongst you will notice a new addition to my blog design – a creative commons license.  You’ll find it at the bottom of the left column.  You may have to scroll down a way!  It looks like this:

liz cable blog cc license

We’ve been learning about Creative Commons and Public Domain licensing in our Online Research class, and we are all busy going through our images and media on our blogs to make sure we are giving credit where it’s due, thanking those who have allowed us to use their media. Alternatively we may have to  choose new media when we realise we haven’t got the creator’s permission to use something, or if we can’t track down where we got it from (a very common occurrence!).

However, we really need to protect ourselves as writers and media creators too.  Assuming we want our work to be shared – how can we let people know?

You can learn the WHY of creative commons licensing

You can learn the WHAT of creative commons licensing 

And as for HOW to add the license to my blog, these are the steps I went through:

How to add a Creative Commons License to a wordpress.com blog.

Go to the Creative Commons site, and choose  a Creative Commons License

CC choose a license

Choose a license here.

The code you need to add to your WordPress site will be automatically generated in the bottom right box.

In another browser tab, login your WordPress Site and go to the Dashboard.

From the Menu choose Appearance, and then Widgets.  The one you want is the Text Widget

Click on the Text Widget and drop it into one of the sidebars of your blog.

text box

 

Give it a title – I just put “license”.

Then copy and past the text from your license box into the text box.

Press the blue [SAVE] button and you are done.

Remember that if you are at any point going to use media with a share-a-like license, then you need to make your media share-a-like too.

 

 

Flashnotes – The Collaborative Economy meets Social Learning

Students creating learning for other students, and making money from it too?  If only.

But that’s what’s promised by Flashnotes – a new collaborative peer-to-peer learning marketplace where students can offer services or create resources such as flashcards for other students, and earn a weekly commission on their sale.  I’m an enthusiast both for using technology for learning, and for social business models, so this should be right up my street.

In his LinkedIn profile, founder Mike Matousek says

Flashnotes is on a mission to provide college students with two things — more money and better grades. On Flashnotes.com, college students sell and buy course-specific study materials — study guides, notes, flashcards, video tutorials, and live video help.  Flashnotes.com Pays2Study (TM) approach empowers smart college students to make money from their own study material while helping other students study smarter to get better grades.

flashnotes sale

A quick look through the busy marketplace, shows one enterprising student has earned $126 selling a Final Exam Study Guide, so it’s obviously striking a chord with students.  Though as a lecturer it leaves me feeling a little uncomfortable, and not just because of money changing hands for what I would like to encourage as commonplace collaboration, but because of the potential plagiarism issues.  Would you like your “complete semester notes” – as translated by one of your students – to be for sale online?

There are no UK Universities on board yet – want to be the first?

 

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