Posts from the “Pedagogy” Category

Dress Up your Blog with WordPress Post Formats

  • What post formats do you use the most?
  • I don’t really use any WordPress post formats other than the “standard” post, and occasionally “video”.
  • How does the video post work?
  • If I post a “video” format post, then all that shows is the video in as wide a part of the screen as possible (whilst still allowing for room for my sidebar).  Whereas if I just put a piece of video as inserted media into my blog, I get a title for the blogpost, a smaller format player, and room for text around it. So I choose the format for each video post accordingly.
  • I was teaching blogging to some postgrad researchers the other day, and when I showed them the different formats for posts they got quite excited at the thought of not always having to write a long form article every time they blogged.  It kindled my curiosity as to what the other formats would look like if used correctly.
format
  • The table above shows all 9 formats that come with the Chalk theme I use for my blog, the one I’ve chosen for this post is “Chat”.
  • So that’s why this post is coming up in this new format – it’s emulating a conversation?
  • Yes, just use an unordered list (or bullet points to the rest of us) and WordPress does the rest.
  • To find out what post formats come with your blog theme, go to the support page for your theme. Then you too can find out if you can talk to yourself.
  • Or perhaps use it next time you are reporting an interview.

Games vs Game-based Learning vs Gamification

Academic Bloggers

This list is compiled from the participants in the #LTHEChat (Learning and teaching in Higher Education) about the value of academic blogging.

The chat takes place every Wednesday evening (BST) from 8-9pm find out more on the LTHEChat website and follow them on Twitter @LTHEChat

  • Academic Blogs Academic blogs from the University of Glasgow
  • Christopher Wiley Information and expert comment and teaching notes on popular and classical music topics
  • David Hopkins eLearning, MOOCs, Blogging, Social Media, and the stuff in between. Author of The Really Useful #EdTechBook
  • Educational Vignettes A team blog sharing practice, ideas, expertise and activities in the field of educational development
  • How Sheila Sees IT ponderings from the world of educational technology in HE
  • James Clay News and views on e-learning, ILT and tech stuff in general…
  • Kate Soper Thoughts Personal reflections on technology enhanced learning
  • Laura Ritchie Musings on teaching, researching, performing, and learning music in HE
  • Learning and Technology Reflections Thoughts about learning, teaching and technology in HE
  • Sue Beckingham Helping you get started using social media for learning, teaching and research
  • Textile Conservation A blog about textile conservation at the University of Glasgow.

 

Do the right thing! (talk by Simon Wilson)

Flashnotes – The Collaborative Economy meets Social Learning

Students creating learning for other students, and making money from it too?  If only.

But that’s what’s promised by Flashnotes – a new collaborative peer-to-peer learning marketplace where students can offer services or create resources such as flashcards for other students, and earn a weekly commission on their sale.  I’m an enthusiast both for using technology for learning, and for social business models, so this should be right up my street.

In his LinkedIn profile, founder Mike Matousek says

Flashnotes is on a mission to provide college students with two things — more money and better grades. On Flashnotes.com, college students sell and buy course-specific study materials — study guides, notes, flashcards, video tutorials, and live video help.  Flashnotes.com Pays2Study (TM) approach empowers smart college students to make money from their own study material while helping other students study smarter to get better grades.

flashnotes sale

A quick look through the busy marketplace, shows one enterprising student has earned $126 selling a Final Exam Study Guide, so it’s obviously striking a chord with students.  Though as a lecturer it leaves me feeling a little uncomfortable, and not just because of money changing hands for what I would like to encourage as commonplace collaboration, but because of the potential plagiarism issues.  Would you like your “complete semester notes” – as translated by one of your students – to be for sale online?

There are no UK Universities on board yet – want to be the first?

 

All the world’s a stage… the drama entertainment of the future? – The University of Nottingham

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